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Advice on constructing a Personal Statement and Referee info

Discussion in 'Personal Statements and UCAS forms' started by Kev, Jul 3, 2004.

  1. Mark____

    Mark____ New Member

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    I think that you are a great opportunity to get behind the veil that is "The Admissions Panel"

    What exactly do you guys look for?
    Phrases you would look at and say "Yum"?

    I'm already in but I'd love to know...
     
  2. yeliab_cram

    yeliab_cram New Member

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    I wish i could tell you, but then i'd have to kill you ;)
     
  3. Mark____

    Mark____ New Member

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    Poor show!
    Come onnnnnnn, I'm genuinely interested.

    I plan to go to the admissions depo when I get to Uni, buy them a box of sweet cakes or something, and ask them what they actually look for... It's terribly cloak-and-dagger of you, old bean!
     
  4. yeliab_cram

    yeliab_cram New Member

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    In all honesty it is very difficult to give a specific example. Its more that certain "je ne sais pas." often a well written/spoken, mature answer. For example someone who shows a well-rounded understanding of current NHS politics and still wants to go into medicine is rare and reasurring. Most applicants come across as naive and unaware.

    If you can show you understand the interests or concerns of those sat behind the table, you are off to a good start.
     
  5. Mark____

    Mark____ New Member

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    What are the concerns, specifically, of those behind the table?
    So, would you wager that "helping people"/"making a difference to people's lives" is a naive thing to say in a statement?
     
  6. yeliab_cram

    yeliab_cram New Member

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    it is probably a naive thing to say and it is definately a cliché, however its not an unreasonable part of your reason. Its definately part of mine. The interview is never won, only lost on the "why medicine?" question.

    It is a hurdle to negotiate, not really one to impress on. It is how you answer the more challenging questions that set candidates apart. These vary both between medical schools and between interviewers. But there are generally one or two fairly standard killer questions. Answer them with maturity and insight and little light "bing" on in the interviwers' heads.
     
  7. Mark____

    Mark____ New Member

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    Sorry to continue bugging you but what would you deem as a killer question?
    A make or break sort of question that people either nail or people either fail?
     
  8. yeliab_cram

    yeliab_cram New Member

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    Each medical school usually has a qn that statistically sets apart the best from the worst. I don't think it would be very responsible to publish such questions and model answers on this site. It defies the point of them. They are simply questions which require an opinion but also an awareness of society around you.

    someone who can show a profound understanding of the world around them will do well. Its not about knowing about "medicine" but being well versed in current affairs. Showing maturity to think beyond your own socio-cultural grouping.
     
  9. jdamisa

    jdamisa New Member

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    I think u've got more work exp than many people I know including myself.The important thing is not how much work experience u have but what u gained from it and how the work exp has prepared u as a student to study medecine.
    I really don't have an answer to the other question as I am as confused as u are
     
  10. Catherine Earnshaw

    Catherine Earnshaw New Member

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    my referee has mentioned that i'm "quiet and somewhat reserved" (twice) in my reference. Would this put me at a disadvantage? Since the deadline is approaching, can someone help me sooner?

    Mant thanx,
    Cathy.
     
  11. Medic2013

    Medic2013 New Member

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    well you might want to voice your opinion (no pun intended :p), and ask your teacher what made them mention it twice?

    my bet would be to not (might aggravate the situation-you can judge the lay of the land best), but just work on the bits in your personal statement that show you can and are vocal be it some extra curricular stuff you do, employment history etc, which would balance it out, and if you can land an interview, then that is like the best opportunity to proove yourself.

    just as an after thought (personal question-no need to answer)-do you think of yourself as quiet?
     
  12. Potters Girl

    Potters Girl New Member

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    Hi guys
    i was just wondering would it be alright for me to use my work experience place to do my reference? (even though it was for a short period of time) my tutor from last year i cant depend on at all! What should i do??? Help pleaseeeee x
     
  13. dcglim

    dcglim New Member

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    Personal statement Advice

    I am a doctor & run a professional course giving advice to students writing their personal statements. I have read over a hundred personal statements & would like to add my "2 cents".

    An average personal statement simply makes general statements. An outstanding personal statement is "personalised".

    For example, an average personal statement describes that the candidate is in interested Science & the importance of Science is in Medicine or how fascinated he/she is in the workings of the human body. This is very common & it is simply making a statement about Medicine or Science. It does not "sell" the candidate to the shortlister. In fact it is a waste of words making statements like these.

    An outstanding personal statement concentrates on the candidate & illustrates the individual's interest in the caring side of Medicine. Too many candidates forget that Medicine is more than just about Science & forget about the human & caring aspects which medical schools look for.

    Also, you should show your commitment to helping others by mentioning your voluntary work in nursing homes, charities or community projects. Or maybe you help your neighbours or are a carer for a family member. And try to describe your emotions, like the sense of satisfaction or reward you feel in helping others. This makes it more believeable plus you are backing up your words with action. It sounds really soppy but believe me, its a lot better than going on about Science.

    I hope this helps. When I get the chance, I will add in more tips on this forum.
     
  14. agneishd

    agneishd Active Member

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    Link everything to stuff YOU have done, and things you have researched further and have a specific interest in
     
  15. ruridh17

    ruridh17 New Member

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    Dandelion:

    I dont think they want a lot of detil regarding your hobbies. It is more about what you get from them. Eg, if you play three instruments then you are showing you can be commited to something for a long period of time.

    Playing basketball would again show commitment, but it would also show that you can work effectively within a team, which is always a good line to put somewhere in ps.

    Again, the amount of voluntary work required isnt huge. You just need to show what you gained from it. Not just that you followed a GP or whatever for a week. But that it allowed you to see how different health professionals worked together to correctly treat the patient. Some mumbo jumbo jargon like that.

    Any more questions, PM me. :)
     
    #55 ruridh17, Apr 17, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2008
  16. agneishd

    agneishd Active Member

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    if its a lot, you could always put some other stuff on the reference (make a request to your referee)

    not a lot of detail, they can ask you at interview in more detail if they are interested :)
     
  17. miqbal

    miqbal New Member

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    Is it worth writing more about things such as the these than other things? Are these the things that uni's look for?
     
  18. S4INT

    S4INT New Member

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    Yeah if we have lots of stuff to write (I tried a personal statement first draft and it came in at 1000 words long) where do we prioritise the bulk of our text. Because I'm going to need to cut mine down somewhere...
    Danke
     
  19. ScarTissue

    ScarTissue New Member

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    Hi :) I have a question... As I'm an EU candidate, should I put in my personal statement reasons why I want to study in the UK?
    Thanks
     
  20. hoonosewot88

    hoonosewot88 New Member

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    Yeh i think a short paragraph on that would be nice Scartissue.
    Obviously its a big step to be making and its worth explaining. It may even open up a chance to send a flattering comment their way :D
     

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