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How old is too old to study medicine

Discussion in 'Mature Students' started by matmed1, Jun 18, 2010.

  1. 1 Ace

    1 Ace New Member

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    Need Guidance

    I hope you are well, i just came across your post. I am 43 and would love to study medicine. Can you help and advise me how to proceed

     
  2. AussieBoy

    AussieBoy Member

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    The challenges of being an older student are different from being an older doctor in my experience.

    1) Old student
    Generation gap to face with peers everyday
    Constant raised eyebrows from patients.
    Costant explanations to everyone you meet
    No standing in society
    No money
    exams
    Unpredictable work load

    2) Old doctor
    Tiring
    Realistically surgery isn't going to happen
    Long hours place impost on family
    You will get moved about the place

    Plus many many more

    You have to consider both 1 and 2 when applying as an older student.
     
  3. IAR

    IAR New Member

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    So is getting into med school at 36/37/38 something to reconsider then?
     
  4. Armadillo

    Armadillo New Member

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    It's not something to reconsider, just something to consider realistically. I went to a GEM open day a few days ago and the oldest on the course was 45, so 38 is still relatively young.
     
  5. IAR

    IAR New Member

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    Wow that's good

    Thanks for that info

    But I wonder if that's more the exception than the norm
     
  6. Arra

    Arra New Member

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    This just goes to show how much things have changed in four years. The Equality Act 2010 makes statements like the one above unlawful. It is illegal to discriminate against someone on grounds of age, gender, sexuality, race, social class, or religious belief. St George's have since removed this from their website. However, that final sentence of theirs simply smacks of discrimination:

    "Some specialities may be reluctant to allow a candidate who is [insert prejudice here] to begin that training."

    On the subject of long hours and stress; don't those things affect everyone of all ages? I mean, is being a junior doctor any more or less stressful than being a barista in a busy café on a 10 to 12 hour shift?

    Also, if anyone's tried to fit a part time PhD in and around a full-time job, plus voluntary work, etc. then I really don't see what the problem is (apart from it being a "ball ache"). Indeed, most academics are expected to put in a 60 hour week due to combining research with teaching/project supervision duties.
     
  7. AussieBoy

    AussieBoy Member

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    Relative to the 45 year old, 38 is indeed relatively young.

    Relative to the vast majority of students the course, 38 is relatively old.

    The key determinate of how you'll fell socially is whether there's enough of an oldie contingent in the 30+ with kids bracket. If there's enough of you, it's much more enjoyable.
     
  8. nikami

    nikami Member

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    I know that what you are saying is from your experience in the medical profession. Can you then explain how to make work life more enjoyable if someone like me can't able to find an oldie contingent with a kid? Thanks!!
     
  9. AussieBoy

    AussieBoy Member

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    I went to two med schools.

    In the first, it was a mixed course and there was a group of people in the same stage of life as me.

    In the second, it was an almost purely undergrad course and there was nothing I could do but wait until they got a bit older. It was better then.

    I forgot how much of my social life I derived from work. I missed it when I went to university on the undergrad course.
     
  10. nikami

    nikami Member

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    Ahh ok. Thanks for sharing your experience.
    But I guess in the end what it matters is you achieved your purpose. And I am sure you are feeling great about this.
    Right?? :D
     
  11. AussieBoy

    AussieBoy Member

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    It's just different. My old job in finance had 90 hours weeks, but nothing like the constant 5am - 8pm days I'm getting in surgery (athough mine is an extreme rotation).

    The pressure to get your patients sorted on the preround before the boss arrives is terrific. Add a few deteriorating sick patients plus arrogant and abusive radiologists and the hassle to get someone's flat white order correct or the client's spreadsheet accurate gains a bit of perspective.
     
  12. AussieBoy

    AussieBoy Member

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    If I'd stayed at the med school with students with kids - well worth it.

    Spending 5 years with undergraduates alone - highly equivocal.
     
  13. JJRO

    JJRO New Member

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    I
    I would really, really love to know how the older students / prospective students in this thread are doing now... would anyone like to tell the next cohort of aspiring oldies if everything turned out ok or not? I need to know if there's a happy ending!
     
  14. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

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    I'm sitting finals in March...

    I hope it ends happily!
     
  15. JJRO

    JJRO New Member

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    That's awesome. I'm really happy for you!

    I'm 31 without a science background and a 2.2 (1 mark from a 2.1). My partner is from the US... any idea if it would be possible to get into a school in the UK, then transfer to the US for residency? I would be able to become a US resident. Thanks for any help you can give. I also would like to have kids at some point.... is this all too much for one lifetime???
     
  16. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

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    Yes you can take your USMLE after medical school and head stateside. I would recommend that you complete F1 in the UK however, as otherwise you will not be fully registered with the GMC, Which would have implications if you then want to come back.

    I'm not that knowledgeable on the USMLE though. But if you are thinking that way a UK traditional style medical school may be better prep.
     
  17. AussieBoy

    AussieBoy Member

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    No one fails.

    I'm sure you'll go very well.

    All the best.

    AB
     
  18. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

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    Yes they do.
     
  19. indigotutor

    indigotutor New Member

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    Studying medicine will depend on your maturity. I heard that medical schools are no longer allowed to imposed limits on ages.
     
  20. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

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    They haven't for years. I know a 56 year old medical student...
     

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