How to get to UK from US

gfdaly

New Member
Hi! I'm a UK citizen who has been living in the US for about 10 years, and I'm currently in medical school in the US. I want to practise in the UK, and I'm looking for any advice/information on when to move and what the requirements would be. For instance, is it feasible to move to the UK as soon as I've graduated from the US med school, even though I won't be licensed yet? I'd like to go back to the UK as soon as possible, but am wondering if I should do a transitional year in the US in order to finish the USMLE series. Will I have to take PLAB or is there an international board exam? What would I be applying for - Foundation year? And how/where do I do that?
Thanks for any information!!
 

chocolatebuddy

New Member
contact the GMC and explain what qualifications you have, what you will have etc, by the time you want to come over. They can best advise you as to whether or not you need to so any link tests etc.
btw...what was your original degree in and how old-ish are you? 'cause in the states Medical School is grad entry right?
good luck!
 

gfdaly

New Member
Yes..medical school in the US is a grad degree, which is partly why I'm so confused as to what to do! My undergraduate degree is in biology - right now I'm 22 and in the first of four years of medical school. In the US, medical school is 2 years of classroom learning, and 2 years of clinical experience (which I assume is similar to Foundation Year 1 and 2). Then we apply for a residency, which is where we do our specialty training...but we're not technically licensed to practise until we take the final step of the licensing exam, which you don't do until after you've completed the first year of residency. It's hard to determine what the best time would be to move to the UK...if I move before completing that first year of residency, I won't be licensed - but I'm not sure if that matters.
 

giella

New Member
I think you'll probably find that you have to complete your internship and gain your full licence before moving to the UK. Otherwise your degree could turn out to be useless.
I can't remember where I heard that nugget of information and it could be wrong, but it's a common stipulation that medical practitioners be licenced first.
You won't have to worry about immigration though so that's a plus. The AP is right, contact the GMC and take it from there.
 

kizdxb

New Member
sorry gfdaly im not much help..but im sure there more knowlegable people on this forum than me that can help you.
PS kinkerz is not one of them
 

Kinkerz

Active Member
sorry gfdaly im not much help..but im sure there more knowlegable people on this forum than me that can help you.
PS kinkerz is not one of them
Here's a start!

Hi! I'm a UK citizen who has been living in the US for about 10 years, and I'm currently in medical school in the US. I want to practise in the UK, and I'm looking for any advice/information on when to move and what the requirements would be. For instance, is it feasible to move to the UK as soon as I've graduated from the US med school, even though I won't be licensed yet? I'd like to go back to the UK as soon as possible, but am wondering if I should do a transitional year in the US in order to finish the USMLE series. Will I have to take PLAB or is there an international board exam? What would I be applying for - Foundation year? And how/where do I do that?
Thanks for any information!!
Why would you want to move from the US to the UK?
Okay if there are personal issues stop reading here, but the career structure and flow is better in the US than the UK at the moment. As far as I know, career opportunities are far and away better in the US currently.
 

giella

New Member
To quote or rather paraphrase scrubs, the average newly qualified doctor is saddled with over $100,000 worth of debt and earns about as much as a waiter. And it's true. Plus doctors are basically seen as law suits with legs and stethoscopes, even more so than here. Opportunities aren't that fantastic in that light. It's also rather difficult to get established over there, from what I know from a couple of people I know in medical school over there. Your reputation can be something that you have to buy into and your career may well be made or trashed before you even begin.
 

Spencer Wells

Noodly Doctory Moderator
In the US, medical school is 2 years of classroom learning, and 2 years of clinical experience (which I assume is similar to Foundation Year 1 and 2).
And there you'd be wrong. Foundation year 1 is equivalent to internship and foundation year 2 equivalent to the R2 year. In the UK med school is 2 years of lectures followed by 3 years of clinical rotations. Only then would one start foundation training.
 

giella

New Member
true, but only in terms of the amount of training a new doctor receives in each country. You take a US medical student and I'm almost certain they can't practise over here without having completed their internship. Could be wrong though.
 

Spencer Wells

Noodly Doctory Moderator
true, but only in terms of the amount of training a new doctor receives in each country. You take a US medical student and I'm almost certain they can't practise over here without having completed their internship. Could be wrong though.
Yes. Although technically an American graduate could apply before completing internship, for a foundation year 1 post, they would be at a disadvantage as EU students will get preference over all other IMGs. Given that home graduates will take most places, then EU grads, there will be very few (if any) available for IMGs. If they where to complete a suitable internship, however, they would then be eligible for full registration, and could slot in later on when there are more places available.
 

giella

New Member
Also true. However, the preference is determined by the immigration laws as well. The OP is a UK national, studying and living in the US. The preference for home and EU graduates might not apply to this one.
 
M

Mac5800

Guest
It does as they have a foreign medical qualification, so for all intents and purposes the OP will likely be considered 'foreign' to the NHS but will just not have visa issues.
 
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